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How To Make Bandanas As Wearable Face Masks

How To Make Bandanas As Wearable Face Masks - Bandana Fever

Want to know how to make bandanas as wearable face masks? This tutorial will show you how to take a simple 21″x21″ bandana scarf and make a DIY homemade facemask. The world is adopting the idea of bandanas as wearable face masks as protection from the Coronavirus these days. Covid-19 is a contagious virus and you need to protect your face. Bandana scarves will do the trick to protect your nose and mouth. Even The CDC is on-board:

DIY Homemade Bandana Face Covering (no sew method)

Materials

Bandana (or square cotton cloth approximately 20”x20”)

Rubber bands (or hair ties)

Scissors (if you are cutting your own cloth)

CDC Website

Bandanas As Face Masks Tutorial

How to make a face mask from a bandana?

Bandana Fever - Bandanas As Face Masks Tutorial - A single bandana is lying flat. Approximately 22" x 22". Fold it in half
Bandana Fever Bandanas As Face Masks Tutorial – A single bandana is lying flat. Approximately 22″ x 22″. Fold it in half.
Bandana Fever -The square bandanna is shown lying flat. The bandanna is then folded in half, bringing the top edge of the bandanna to meet the bottom edge of the bandanna.
Bandana Fever – Fold top down. Fold bottom up.
Bandana Fever - Place rubber bands 6 inches apart.
Bandana Fever – Place rubber bands 6 inches apart.
Bandana Fever - Take the left side and the right side of the bandanna and fold each side to the middle and tuck the sides into each other.
Bandana Fever – Fold the sides to the middle and tuck them.
Bandana Fever - The bandana should now be a continuous loop.
Bandana Fever – The bandanna should now be a continuous, cloth loop since the left and right sides have been tucked into each other.
Bandana Fever - Fit the mask snugly but comfortably against the side of the face.
Bandana Fever – Fit the mask snugly but comfortably against the side of the face.

CDC on Homemade Cloth Face Coverings

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

Simple cloth face coverings also slow the spread of the virus and furthermore help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost are eligible for use.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on:

  • young children under age 2,
  • anyone who has trouble breathing,
  • or is unconscious,
  • incapacitated
  • or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

CDC Website